Subscribe to the Dovetail weekly digest & magazine

 
 

Required fields

 
 

September 23, 2016

UNIVERSAL HARM REDUCTION ADVICE (VIDEO)

Harm reduction is a key underlying principle of working with young people who use alcohol and other drugs. While there are a range of substance specific harm reduction practices, there are also a number of standard pieces of harm reduction advice that is relevant for any young person, regardless of the substance they might be using. The Dovetail team have created a new short video called "Universal Harm Reduction." In this short 5 minute video, Dovetail's Cameron Francis goes through some of the key principles of providing good harm reduction advice, and then provides some examples of harm reduction advice in practice.

Watch "Universal harm reduction"

Read More

 

September 22, 2016

EUROPEAN SCHOOL SURVEY PROJECT ON ALCOHOL AND OTHER DRUGS

The European Monitoring Centre for Drugs and Drug Addiction (EMCDDA) have released the results from the European School Survey Project on Alcohol and Other Drugs (ESPAD). ESPAD is based on information provided by approximately 96,000 students from 35 European countries and found a general decreasing trend in cigarette and alcohol use among young people. About 16% of the young people in this sample had ever used cannabis, a rate similar to the Australian lifetime prevalence of cannabis in school aged young people, which was 14.8% in 2011. There was evidence that rates of cannabis use had peaked in the EUropean young people in 2003, and there had then been a slight decline since that time. New psychoactive substances (those designed to mimic the effects of other illegal drugs) had higher prevalence than other illicit drugs including amphetamine, ecstasy, cocaine and LSD with 4% of the students reporting use of a new psychoactive substance.

Go to "The 2015 ESPAD Report"

Read More

 

September 22, 2016

CAN EXERCISE OFFSET SOME OF THE HARMS OF REGULAR DRINKING?

The UK government health service, the NHS, operates a website that provides plain English summaries of recent research.  Last week, they published an article titled "Can exercise offset some of the regular harms of regular drinking?".  The article describes a study published in the British Journal of Sports Medicine which collected data on 36 370 people aged over 40, and tracked their alcohol consumption and levels of physical activity. The study found a direct link between all levels of alcohol consumption and risk of cancer mortality.  The study also found that the more a person exercised, the less their risk of cancer mortality as well as death by any causes.  In people with the highest levels of physical activity, there was no significant link between any amount of alcohol consumption and cancer mortality.

Go to "Can exercise offset some of the harms of regular drinking?"

Read More

 

September 16, 2016

EX-ICE USERS LECTURING KIDS ISN'T THE ANSWER TO PREVENTING DRUG USE

Associate Professor Nicole Lee from the National Drug Research Institute and Nicola Newton from the National Drug and Alcohol Research Centre have published an article on The Conversation titled "Ex-ice users lecturing kid's isn't the answer to preventing drug use."  The article describes a program developed by the Australian Anti Ice Campaign based on the Montana Meth Project, which while well intentioned has been shown to increase positive perceptions of methamphetamine use. The authors describe what works in school drug education, based on decades of research. The authors also highlight the potential unintended consequences of poorly designed school drug prevention campaigns, which can include increases in substance use, risk and harm.

Go to "Ex-ice users lecturing kid's isn't the answer to preventing drug use"

Read More

 

September 16, 2016

REHAB INC: THE HIGH PRICE PARENTS PAY TO GET THEIR KIDS OFF ICE

ABC's 4 Corners recently screened a report titled "Rehab Inc: The high price parents pay to get their kids of ice."  The report describes the difficulties parents experience in getting their loved ones access to residential treatment in Australia.  Publicly funded places are limited, and an unregulated private industry has emerged, charging up to $30 000 for treatment which in some cases may not be evidence based or ethical.  The episode highlights the difficulties families face when attempting to assist a loved one accessing treatment.

Watch "Rehab Inc" here.

Read More

 

September 16, 2016

THE AUSTRALIAN PSYCHOLOGICAL SOCIETY APOLOGISES TO ABORIGINAL AND TORRES STRAIT ISLANDER PEOPLE

The Australian Psychological Society (APS), the peak body for psychologists, has made a formal apology for the mistreatment of the First Nation's people through culturally inappropriate psychological practices that have contributed to the devaluing of Indigenous culture. In the apology, the director of the society's board, Tim Carey, apologised on behalf of the APS for the "inappropriate use of assessment techniques and procedures that have conveyed misleading and inaccurate messages about the abilities and capacities of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people".  The APS also apologised for its "silence and lack of advocacy" on behalf of Indigenous Australians on important policies such as the forced removal of children that led to the stolen generations. The APS will urge its members to abandon some diagnostic tools, which are culturally problematic for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.


Read the full apology from the APS here.


Read a media article from The Guardian Australia "Psychologists apologise to Indigenous Austrlaians for decades of mistreatment"

Read More

 

September 9, 2016

AUSTRALIAN GUIDE TO THE DIAGNOSIS OF FASD

The "Australian Guide to the Diagnosis of FASD" is has been recently developed to assist health practitioners in the diagnosis of FASD and to make sure once a diagnosis is made, people get the support required to manage the condition. The diagnostic tool differentiates between FASD with three sentinel facial features (which is similar to the previous diagnostic category of "Fetal Alcohol Syndrome") and FASD with less than three sentinel facial features (which encompasses the previous dianostic categories of "Partial Fetal Alcohol Syndrome" and "Neurodevelopmental Disorder-Alcohol Exposed').  The website includes e-learning modules to assist in upskillng workers in identifying and respoding to FASD.

You can download the Guide here and also access the Diagnostic Instrument E-Learning modules.

Read More

 

September 9, 2016

WHAT'S UP WITH GEN Y?

The Youth Research Centre at the University of Melbourne has published a research report titled "Life Patterns, 10 Years Following Gen Y". Life Patterns is a 25-year and ongoing longitudinal study and follows two generations of Australians, 'Generation X' and 'Generation Y', so comparisons can be made across different points in their lives and explores the pathways of life taken by young people including their experiences in education, work, family and personal relationships and health and wellbeing. This paper focusses on the generation that left secondary school in 2006, providing a summary of the last 10 years shows meaningful relationships, financial security and providing for family have remained a high priority for Gen Y.  The report describes Gen Y as valuing full time work, but the increasing casualisation of the labor market is making this more and more difficult to achieve.

Download "Life Patterns: Ten years following Generation Y"

Read More

 

September 9, 2016

WHY ARE SO MANY PEOPLE IN THE UK DYING FROM ECSTASY OVERDOSES?

Vice Magazine has published an article titled "Why are so many more people in the UK dying from Ecstasy overdoses?"  The article describes the increase in MDMA related deaths in the UK, with 8 MDMA related deaths recorded in 2013, rising to 50 in 2014. The article describes the increasing purity of MDMA which has occurred over the last few years, with an increase in so-called "super pills" which contain over 250mg of MDMA - more than twice the usual dose.

Go to "What are so many more people in the UK dying from Ecstasy overdoses?"

Read More

 

September 2, 2016

UNDERSTANDING ONLINE DRUG CRYPTOMARKETS

Drug cryptomarkets are online drug marketplaces which exist on the encrypted internet (sometimes referred to as the dark net).  The most well known of these is the now defunct "Silk Road", which operated like an EBay for illicit drugs.  Since Silk Road was closed down, the number of drug cryptomarkets has increased, with new markets appearing (and disappearing) rapidly. This has coincided with an increase in people purchasing drugs online.  The International Journal of Drug Policy has dedicated the entire September issue of the journal to the topic of drug cryptomarkets, and the articles are available for free until the end of October.  This edition contains a number of articles authored by Australian researchers including Dr Monica Barratt and Dr Jason Ferris.

Go to "International Journal of Drug Policy September Issue: Drug Cryptomarkets"

Read More