Subscribe to the Dovetail weekly digest & magazine

 
 

Required fields

 
 

August 29, 2014

AUSTRALIAN WINTER SCHOOL 2014 PRESENTATIONS AVAILABLE NOW

The Australian Winter School conference happened back in July, and the conference organisers at Lives Lived Well have now published a number of the conference presentations online, as well as video of a number of the key note speakers and panel discussions. If you weren't able to make it along, you can sit back watch some of the best speakers from Australian and abroad present on a diverse range of topics from novel psychoactive substances, responding to the challenges and pressures of the AOD service delivery environment, pharmaceutical drug misuse and much more.  And if that's not enough, Lives Lived Well have announced the dates for next year's conference -July 22 - 24 and the call for abstracts is already open!  So mark out your diaries and start planning your presentation today.

View PDFs of a selection of presentations here

Watch videos from the Australian Winter School 2014 here (password to access is delegate2014)

Read More

 

August 29, 2014

HOW BIG IS THE GLOBAL DRUG TRADE?

The global trade in illicit drugs is a massive industry - so massive that it's sometimes hard to comprehend the amounts of money involved and the significant political instability that illicit drug production and distribution can cause.  We came across this fascinating infographic during the week that attempts to present this information in an easy to understand format.  From the price of cocaine in South America right through to the streets of the United States, to the unique smuggling methods employed - this infographic helps to put global drug production and supply into perspective.

Go to "How big is the drug trade?"

Read More

 

August 29, 2014

YOUNG PEOPLE'S OPINIONS ON ALCOHOL AND OTHER DRUG ISSUES

The Australian National Council on Drugs has published a report titled "Young people's opinions on alcohol and other drugs issues".  The report is the result of a survey of 2335 young people from across Australia, the majority of whom had completed year 12 education and had experience with alcohol use (95.1%), cannabis (71.9%), ecstasy (47.7%) and hallucinogens (41.3%).  The report notes that young Australians expressed strong support for treatment and rehabilitation, but also strong support for harm reduction measures with over two thirds supportive of measures such as needle and syringe programs, regulated injecting facilities and pill testing services.  Also, more than two thirds of respondents indicated that they were opposed to increasing the price of alcohol, reducing trading hours, reducing alcohol outlets, or raising the drinking age.

Download "Young people's opinions on alcohol and other drug issues" here. (3.9MB PDF)

Read More

 

August 22, 2014

NATIONAL ALCOHOL AND DRUG KNOWLEDGEBASE

The National Centre for Education and Training on Addiction (NCETA) has launched the National Alcohol and Drug Knowledgebase.  The website looks at alcohol, cannabis, pharmaceuticals and methamphetamine and provides an easy to understand "Frequently Asked Question" format for each of the drugs.  At this stage the website only contains information around alcohol, but the remaining areas will be populated over time.  The site will also update information as new research is released.

Go to the National Alcohol and Drug Knowledgebase website.

Read More

 

August 22, 2014

ALCOHOL AND OTHER DRUG TREATMENT SERVICES IN AUSTRALIA 2012-13

The Australian Institute of Health and Welfare has published their annual "Alcohol and other drug treatment services in Australia 2012 - 13".  This report complies data from over 700 agencies throughout Australia, who provided more than 160 000 treatment episodes or approximately 108 000 clients in 2012-13.  The report has noted decreases in episodes where alcohol is nominated as the principal drug of concern from 48% of presentations in 2009-10 to 41% of presentations in 2012-13.  On the other hand, presentations where amphetamines are nominated as the principal drug of concern have increased from 7% of presentations in 2009-10 up to 14% of presentations in 2012-13.

Go to "Alcohol and other drug treatment services in Australia 2012-13"

Read More

 

August 22, 2014

DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNITIES FUNDING AVAILABLE

The Queensland Department of Communities, Child Safety and Disability Services has announced funding available for two significant outcomes of the recent review of child protection services in Queensland.  The Department is inviting services to submit offers for the "Child Safety - Community Based Intake and Referral services" and also "Child Safety - Intensive Family Support Services".  The "Community Based Intake and Referral" services are designed to provide an information, assessment and referral service for vulnerable families including assessing the safety and support needs of children, young people and families.  The "Intensive Family Support Services" involves the delivery of services to vulnerable families with multiple or complex needs.

For more information go to the Department of Communities Funding Website.

Read More

 

August 15, 2014

DOVETAIL SCHOOLS AND DRUGS WEBINAR

Dovetail's "Schools and Drugs" webinar happened a few weeks back and for those who couldn't make it along we've now posted a recording of the presentation to our video library.  The presentation provides an overview of the research in best practice school drug education and prevention, as well as an overview of some of the best tools and resources that can assist school-based workers.

To watch the Dovetail "Schools and Drugs" webinar go here.

Read More

 

August 15, 2014

BRIEF COUNSELLING MAY NOT HELP WITH MOST DRUG PROBLEMS

An article has been published on the United States-based website of the National Public Radio titled "Brief counselling may not help with most drug problems."  The article considers two recent papers published in the Journal of the American Medical Association that tested whether brief interventions were effective.  In one of the studies 500 people who had all been identified by a verbal drug screening at a primary care clinic were divided into three groups: the first two groups received two different brief interventions and the third group received nothing.  At 6 month follow up there were no differences between the three groups.  The second study was similar: patients received a brief counselling session along with a follow-up phone call two weeks later, but this resulted in no changes in substance use, although those people with the most severe problems were more likely to go on to seek out specialist treatment.

Read "Brief counselling may not help with most drug problems."

Read More

 

August 15, 2014

REVIEW OF INTERVENTIONS FOR VOLATILE SUBSTANCE MISUSE IN REGIONAL NORTH QUEENSLAND

Cairns based youth service YETI (Youth Empowered Towards Independence) has published a research report titled "Dignity, Diversion, Home and Hope: A review of interventions for volatile substance misuse in regional North Queensland."   This research report involved interviews with youth and AOD workers in Cairns, Mt Isa, Rockhampton and Townsville, as well as interviews with current and former inhalant users who access services at YETI.  The report includes a series of practice principles and insights directly from young people who use inhalants about what they believed were the most useful approaches workers should use when providing effective services.

Download "Dignity, Diversion, Home and Hope: A review of interventions for volatile substance misuse in regional North Queensland." (620KB PDF)

Read More

 

August 15, 2014

PROHIBITING PUBLIC DRINKING IN AN URBAN AREA: WHAT'S THE IMPACT?

The National Drug Law Enforcement Research Fund has published a paper titled "Prohibiting public drinking in an urban area: Determining the impacts on police, the community and marginalised groups."  The report looked at the impacts of public drinking laws in three inner-urban areas of Melbourne: Cities of Yarra, Darebin and Maribyrnong.  The report found that public drinking laws had no impact on alcohol-related crime or harm, but there was differing impacts in the different regions on the impacts of the laws in terms of reducing congregations of public drinkers.  The report found that public drinking laws made residents feel safer and improved amenity from the perspective of residents and traders.  The report also found that public drinking laws negatively impacted on marginalised people with many of these people unable to pay fines and forced to move to different spaces that may increase harm, such as alleys or railway tracks.

Go to "Prohibiting public drinking in an urban area: Determining the impacts on police, the community and marginalised groups"

Read More