LATEST NEWS

CATEGORIES

ARCHIVES

TAG CLOUD

Did you know?
Australia's first "Needle and Syringe Program" commenced operations as an act of civil disobedience in 1986. By 1993, all Australian states and territories had officially sanctioned Needle and Syringe Programs.
 

Subscribe to the Dovetail weekly digest & magazine

 
 

Required fields

 
 

October 17, 2014

BEST PRACTICE OVERDOSE PREVENTION ON PRISON RELEASE

People who use opioids are known to be at high risk of fatal overdose in the period immediately after being released from prison.  This is due to the changes in tolerance that come with a period of abstinence that prison sometimes brings.  The Eurasian Harm Reduction Network has published a paper titled "Overdose Prevention Services Upon Release From Prison: Best practices from Scotland, Denmark, Italy and Spain."  A number of programs have been proposed to reduce the harm experienced by prisoners on release from prison, including pre-release counselling on overdose risks and prevention, training in first aid and overdose management, or the Scottish practice of providing Naloxone (an antidote to opioid overdose) on release.

Download "Overdose Prevention Services Upon release from Prison: Best Practices from Scotland, Denmark, Italy and Spain" (420KB PDF)

Read More

 

October 10, 2014

QUEENSLAND MENTAL HEALTH DRUG AND ALCOHOL STRATEGIC PLAN LAUNCHED

The Queensland Mental Health Commission (QMHC) has launched the Queensland Mental Health, Drug and Alcohol Strategic Plan 2014 - 2019. The plan is the result of extensive consultation with a broad range of stakeholders including people with personal experience as well as their families and professionals who work with people experiencing mental health or alcohol and other drug problems. The plan is based on four pillars: better services, better awareness, prevention and early intervention, better engagement and collaboration, better transparency and accountability.  Associated with the plan is the "Stronger Community Mental Health and Wellbeing Grants Program", offering a total of $500 000 across three initiatives: Community Wellbeing and Enhancement Initiative, Community Awareness Initiative, and Capacity Building for Community Wellbeing.

More information on the Queensland Mental Health Drug and Alcohol Strategic Plan

More information on the Stronger Community Mental Health and Wellbeing Grants Program

Read More

 

October 10, 2014

ALCOHOL AND LESBIAN WOMEN: INSIGHTS INTO CULTURE AND EMOTIONS

The University of Melbourne has published a research report titled "The ALICE Study: Alcohol and Lesbian / Bisexual Women: Insights into culture and emotions".  This research report aimed to explore the relationship between hazardous drinking, depression and anxiety in same-sex attracted women and to consider the factors that influence help-seeking.  The study involved a web-based survey, followed up with in-depth interviews with some of the participants.  The study found that 40.2% of the survey sample had experienced problematic alcohol use in the past twelve months.  The study also found high rates of lifetime depression (56.2%) and anxiety (46%), as well as suicidal thoughts (58.6%), self-harm (50.3%) and suicide attempts (23.7%).

Download "The ALICE Study: Alcohol and Lesbian / Bisexual Women: Insights into culture and emotions".

Read More

 

October 10, 2014

STRENGTHS OF AUSTRALIAN ABORIGINAL CULTURAL PRACTICES IN CHILD REARING

The Australian Institute of Family Studies has published a document titled "Strengths of Australian Aboriginal cultural practices in family life and child rearing".  The paper considers how some of the characteristics of traditional Aboriginal Torres Strait Islander cultural practices contribute to positive family functioning and child development.  The paper brought together the views of Aboriginal families and incorporated existing evidence about effective child rearing practices.  The report found that "provided the necessary social conditions are in place, culture can be a protective force for children, families and communities."

Download "Strengths of Australian Aboriginal cultural practices in family life and child rearing" (236KB PDF)

Read More

 

October 3, 2014

FUNDING AVAILABLE: CHILD SAFETY AFTER CARE SERVICES

The Department of Communities, Child Safety and Disability services are inviting non-government services to apply for funding to operate After Care services for young people who have been in care.  The focus of the funding is on supporting young people as they prepare to transition to independence.  It will involve supporting young people from the age of 15 who are in care to develop the skills and knowledge to live independently and to ensure that those who have left care are able to receive additional support and services, should they require it, up to the age of 21.

More information is available from the Q Tenders Website.

Read More

 

October 3, 2014

MENTAL HEALTH AND WELLBEING OF GENDER DIVERSE AND TRANSGENDER YOUNG PEOPLE

A new report has been published by La Trobe University and the University of New England titled "From blues to rainbows: The mental health and wellbeing of gender diverse and transgender young people in Australia."  The report is the first national research report looking at the mental health of gender diverse and transgender young people.  The report surveyed 189 young people and found that half were diagnosed with depression, two thirds had experienced verbal abuse, one in five of the young people had experienced physical abuse and 90% had thought about suicide in response to their experience of physical abuse.  The report found that those gender diverse and transgender young people who were supported by their parents, teachers and peers had half the rate of depression when compared with those young people who did not have this support.

For more information and to read the full report go to La Trobe University's website

Read More

 

October 3, 2014

PATHWAYS OF CARE: LONGITUDINAL STUDY ON CHILDREN AND YOUNG PEOPLE IN OUT-OF-HOME CARE IN NSW

The Australian Institute of Family Studies (AIFS) has published a research report titled "Pathways of Care: Longitudinal study on children and young people in out-of-home care in NSW".  Previous research from Australia and overseas has indicated that many young people who live in care experience problems later in life including poorer physical health, socio-economic wellbeing and cognitive / learning ability.  The "Pathways of Care" study commenced in 2011 and has been tracking young people in care, taking into consideration their wellbeing at the time they are first placed into care, their experiences of care and their developmental pathways, in order to better understand the factors that influence poor outcomes.  The first wave of data is now available and papers will be published in the coming months and years based on data recorded by this project.

For more information on the Pathways of Care Longitudinal Study go to the AIFS website.

Read More

 

October 3, 2014

FARE DEVELOPS AD IN RESPONSE TO ALCOHOL-INDUSTRY FUNDED PUBLIC AWARENESS CAMPAIGN

The Foundation for Alcohol Research and Education (FARE) has recently developed an advertisement in response to an alcohol public awareness commercial that was made by Drinkwise, an alcohol industry funded organisation.  FARE CEO Michael Thorn believes that "The latest responsible drinking campaign from Drinkwise is a cleverly disguised beer ad, not a public health message."  The Drinkwise advertisement was screened during the recent AFL grand final and was titled "You won't miss a moment if you Drinkwise".

View the Drinkwise ad  "You won't miss a moment if you Drinkwise"

View FARE's response ad "Drinkwise: The making of a beer ad"

Read FARE CEO Michael Thorn's full critique of the Drinkwise ad here.

Read More

 

October 2, 2014

MISSED LAST WEEK'S DIGEST?

We have heard that some of you may have missed last week's digest because of over-enthusiastic security filters. If so you can find last week's stories here.

Read More

 

September 26, 2014

WHAT WORKS IN FLEXIBLE EDUCATION?

Associate Professor Kitty te Riele from The Victoria Institute has published a report titled "Putting the jigsaw together: Flexible learning options in Australia".  The report describes the three main types of flexible education available in Australia: programs delivered in the TAFE system, alternative education operating within mainstream schools and independent programs.  The report sets out the significant social and economic benefits flexible education programs have been demonstrated to provide, and it proposes a "Framework of Quality Flexible Learning Programs".  Unsurprisingly, quality staffing was found to be one of the keys to successful flexible education programs.  In developing the report,  Professor te Riele also created a database of flexible education program's operating in Australia.

Go to "Putting the jigsaw together: Flexible learning options in Australia"

Read More