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Updated Guidelines for Working with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People Engaging in Non Suicidal Self Injury

Sep 15, 2017

There has been a recent update to the Mental Health First Aid guidelines for working with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people engaging in non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI).  The redevelopment of the guidelines were based on the expert opinions of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander clinicians from across Australia to ensure that they reflect current evidence and best practice and can be shared with Indigenous and non-Indigenous frontline workers.  The re-developed guidelines outline some significant cultural elements that are important for workers to consider when assisting an Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander person who is engaging in NSSI.

There are two other Aboriginal Mental Health First Aid Guidelines that are useful for workers to be used in conjunction - "Communicating with an Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander Adolescent" and "Guidelines for Providing Mental Health First Aid to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People Experiencing Suicidal Thoughts and Behaviour"

Download the "Guideline for providing mental health first aid to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people engaging in non-suicidal self-injury" (321KB PDF)