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Key findings from the “Australians’ Drug Use: Adapting to Pandemic Threats (ADAPT) Study”

Jul 3, 2020

The “Australians’ Drug Use: Adapting to Pandemic Threats (ADAPT)” study was developed and rapidly deployed as covid-19 lockdowns took place, in order to explore the impact of the pandemic on people who use drugs. The authors have now released the results from the first wave, with data collected from 29 April to 15 June 2020. 

702 people completed the survey, with 20% of these respondents living in Queensland. Cannabis and alcohol were the substances most commonly reported to have increased, with 57% and 41% of respondents reporting increases respectively. On the flip side, MDMA and cocaine saw the largest decreases in their reported use, with 49% and 45% of respondents reporting decreases in the use of these substances. This aligns with other research tracking changes in substance use during the covid-19 pandemic. 

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