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‘Even though you hate everything that’s going on, you know they are safer at home’: The role of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander families in methamphetamine use harm reduction and their own support needs

Jun 24, 2022

An article has been published in “Drug and Alcohol Review” titled “‘Even though you hate everything that’s going on, you know they are safer at home’: The role of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander families in methamphetamine use harm reduction and their own support needs”. The article describes 19 focus groups and seven interviews with predominantly Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and service providers, through a social and emotional wellbeing lense. The focus groups and interviews showed the broad range of support offered by families, including in maintaining connections, assistance accessing services and support during crisis.

Families also reported a number of support needs. Participants described guilt and fear of losing loved ones to overdose, but also fears related to criminal activity, and frustration with not knowing how to assist someone who has developed a substance use disorder. Many participants reported serious impacts on their own wellbeing caused by the strain of providing ongoing support, highlighting the importance of considering the needs of families and significant others when working with someone who has a problem with alcohol and other drugs.

Go to “‘Even though you hate everything that’s going on, you know they are safer at home’: The role of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander families in methamphetamine use harm reduction and their own support needs”.